5 Final Predictions for Twin Peaks: The Return

 

Written by Eden H. Roquelaire for Twin Peaks Freaks.

Disclaimer: Contains spoilers for The Secret History of Twin Peaks.

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As we prepare to delve back into the strange and wonderful world of Twin Peaks, we all have our anticipations, our hopes, and our assumptions. If you are looking for some last-minute theories to get you revved up for the premiere this Sunday, look no further. Here are my final predictions for Twin Peaks: The Return.

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5. Big Ed stayed with Nadine

In the recent trailer released from Showtime, Big Ed is seen, presumably at the desk of his Gas Farm, looking pretty sullen. Many fans hoped that 2017 would see Big Ed Hurley finally united with his long-time sweetheart, Norma Jennings. But from the looks of this clip, either things have gone wrong with Norma, or he has stayed in his unhappy marriage to Nadine. Alternately, he may have lost both women. When Nadine comes out of her teenage fantasy, she finally realizes that she has truly lost Ed to Norma. She may have been too heartbroken to go back to Ed, and Norma may have been too tired of Ed’s inability to leave Nadine to stay with him.

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4. There are two Dale Coopers

“My name is Annie, and I’ve been with Laura and Dale. The good Dale is in the Lodge, and he can’t leave. Write it in your diary.”

-Annie Blackburn, Fire Walk With Me

At the end of Twin Peaks Season 2, viewers discovered the worst had happened when Agent Cooper, acting a little oddly after escaping from the Black Lodge, looked into the mirror and saw BOB in the reflection. This left us with an agonizing and iconic cliffhanger, and it would be a shame to not deliver on the 26-year-old promise of seeing an “Evil Dale Cooper.” This cliffhanger was referenced again in Fire Walk With Me when Annie Blackburn, who had also been in the Black Lodge with Cooper, appears to Laura Palmer and tells her that “The good Dale is in the Lodge and he can’t leave.” While it is a confusing situation at best, it would seem to imply that Cooper has become spiritually bisected, leaving his “good” self in the Black Lodge, while his body, possessed by killer BOB, returned to Twin Peaks.

There are many possible approaches that could be taken to this situation, as some fans theorize that the body we see possessed by BOB is actually that of Cooper’s Doppelganger, and not the original Cooper we know and love. Perhaps the Good Dale has finally escaped the Black Lodge, 25 years later, and is hunting down his Doppelganger, or perhaps he still needs to be rescued. If the body is his, and not the Doppelganger’s, then it is possible he will not be able to leave the Black Lodge until his body is returned to him. Perhaps, until that time comes, he will be exploring the various dimensions of the Lodges…

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3. Return to the Roadhouse

When the official cast list for Twin Peaks: The Return was released last year, it was obvious that the new series had enough musicians to fill their 18 episodes, and then some. These musicians include previous Lynch collaborators Julee Cruise, Chrysta Bell, and Trent Reznor, as well as some surprising newcomers like Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder. While it’s not clear if these musicians are simply listed as collaborators on the soundtrack, or will be making an appearance in the show, it would be a lovely treat and in keeping with the original series to include some haunting musical performances on the stage of the Roadhouse.

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2. I’m not saying it’s aliens…

I don’t think we will ever see a spaceship in Twin Peaks. I do think further discussion of Project Blue Book, and blatant addressing of the subject of aliens, is unavoidable in order to progress certain plot elements. But Twin Peaks will never be a sci-fi story. I don’t think Mark Frost or David Lynch want to do that by any means. I don’t think we will ever hear it definitively said that the owls are alien spies, or that the Dugpas are from another planet, as some have speculated. In true enigmatic form, I think it will be left up for interpretation, and implied that the Dugpas are not spirits, or Native American gods, or extraterrestrials, but something beyond our comprehension, and far more terrifying.

Blue Rose

1. The Blue Rose is code for Listening Post Alpha

More than anything else, when the photos for the Entertainment Weekly photo shoot came out earlier this year, I think I was most stunned by the appearance of a blue rose, right there on the table between Audrey and Shelly. One of the enduring mysteries of Twin Peaks is that of the Blue Rose. It only appeared in FWWM, but it made a huge impression on fans. Agent Cooper refers to Teresa Banks’ murder as “one of Gordon Cole’s Blue Rose cases,” and Agent Desmond says that he can’t talk about the Blue Rose with Agent Stanley. With no further information, fans analyzed the symbol as best they could, and came up with some interesting theories. The most popular and most believable of these theories is that the Blue Rose is code for Project Blue Book, due to 1) color association, 2) apparent ties to the government, and 3) the fact that blue roses do not exist in nature, suggesting an “otherworldly” element to them. After reading The Secret History of Twin Peaks, I am convinced more than ever that this theory is very near the mark.

While the Blue Rose itself is never mentioned in The Secret History, we are given more background on Project Blue Book’s connection with the rest of the Twin Peaks mythology. It turns out that newspaper mogul Douglas Milford was, in his younger days, an agent working on Project Blue Book under then-President Richard Nixon. He was, in a manner of speaking, one of the “men in black,” appearing to investigate UFO cases, and other bizarre phenomena for the government. After Nixon’s death, Milford was spurred to create his own successor to Project Blue Book in Twin Peaks itself, known as Listening Post Alpha (LPA). He also recruited Major Garland Briggs to help him, and this is most likely the job that prompted him to so commonly quip, “That’s classified.” Milford then dies, suspected to have been murdered by his wife, possible assassin Lana Budding. He leaves Briggs a letter, philosophizing about the nature of the strange phenomena surrounding Twin Peaks, and concluding by telling Briggs to wait until his “next control arrives.”

Briggs, now in charge of LPA, believes that Agent Cooper has been sent by Gordon Cole to be his aid in these endeavors. This raises an eyebrow. Also contained in the dossier that comprises The Secret History is a list containing the names of FBI agents Cooper, Cole, Desmond, Stanley, Rosenfield, and Jeffries. The nature of this list is never revealed, but it is clearly important. Briggs and Milford must have been working with Cole on some level, otherwise there’s no reason for him to believe that Cole would “send” anyone to Briggs.

Remember how Cooper referred to the Blue Rose cases as being Cole’s? And which agents has Cole assigned to his Blue Rose cases? Agents Cooper, Desmond, Stanley, Rosenfield, and, in all probability, Jeffries. So it isn’t that big of a leap to suspect that the Blue Rose cases are linked to LPA, if not specifically code for LPA and its interests. Adding to this connection is the discovery by one sharp-eyed fan of a blue flower prop in Major Briggs’ house. While it appears to be a tulip, and not a rose, the similarities are distinctly there.

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I could of course be wrong about all of this. After all, the owls are not what they seem, and Lynch and Frost have kept us guessing from the very beginning, and the mystery they created together has lasted 27 long years. Only time will tell what truths are to be unveiled, and what mysteries are to be left uncertain forevermore.

What do you think will happen in the new series? What’s your favorite mystery from the show or the movie? How will you be celebrating the return of Twin Peaks? Post a comment below!

The Owls Are Not What They Seem

Written by Eden H. Roquelaire for Twin Peaks Freaks.

THE GIANT: I will tell you three things. If I tell them to you and they come true, then will you believe me?

COOPER: Who’s that?

THE GIANT: Think of me as a friend.

COOPER: Where do you come from?

THE GIANT: The question is, where have you gone? The first thing I will tell you is: There’s a man in a smiling bag.

COOPER: A man in a smiling bag…

THE GIANT: The second thing is: The owls are not what they seem. The third thing is: Without chemicals, he points.

COOPER: What do these things mean?

THE GIANT: This is all I am permitted to say.

owls

The phrase, “The owls are not what they seem,” is one of the most notorious and highly debated taglines of the Twin Peaks series. While most theorists are able to come to some general consensus about the meaning behind it, not everyone is able to agree on a deeper meaning. So, the owls are not what they seem… but what exactly are they? Dugpas? Demons? Angels? Aliens? Spies? Or something else? In this article, I will delve into the various theories and examine the evidence for each one.

After the Giant relays the ominous message to Cooper, it turns up again when Major Briggs arrives at Coop’s hotel room, bearing a piece of paper containing code. The code was read by “deep space monitors,” which we later learn are actually pointed at the woods in Twin Peaks. Most of the code is “radio waves and gibberish,” except for the phrase, “The owls are not what they seem,” and Cooper’s name repeated. This message was received at roughly the same time Cooper was shot, perhaps right as he was being visited by the Giant, who also relays the message. At first, we are sort of tricked into thinking this message came from aliens in outer space. We only later on learn that these monitors were actually pointed towards Ghostwood, which some branch of the government has apparently been researching as part of Project Blue Book. This last bit of information, of course, is revealed to us during the most hectic days for the Twin Peaks writing staff, about midway through season 2, when both David Lynch and Mark Frost were interested in other projects and the remaining writers were left to patch together the rest of the path based on rough drafts, guesswork, and their own ideas. This has caused certain fans to write it off, though it remains, in fact, canonical.

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Owl-like aliens seen on the cover of Whitley Strieber’s Communion

One popular theory, and the one that fits the best with the Project Blue Book storyline, is that the owls are aliens, as is written by Whitley Strieber in his novel Communion. In this novel, the author says he struggled with suppressed memories of alien abduction, and that, before he unlocked these memories clearly, all he could remember was the image of owls staring at him through his window. He later finds that the owls are a disguise used by the aliens, ergo, they are not what they seem.

If the owls are aliens (of some sort), then the involvement of Major Briggs and Project Blue Book amidst Native American mythology and Tibetan Buddhist spirituality seems a little less inexplicable.

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Another theory is that the owls are possessed by BOB and/or other Dugpas. This theory fits the infamous image of BOB, crouched behind Laura’s bed, with an overlay of an owl face. It also nicely explains how BOB is able to learn some secrets of the townsfolk, as he would be able to spy on them in disguise. Some further supporting points can be discovered by delving into mythology and folklore, which may have been drawn upon by Mark Frost, who would commonly weave such symbols into the mythos of Twin Peaks.

At one point, MIKE refers to BOB as his “familiar.” In black magic lore, a familiar is a demon that takes the form of an animal. In this case, the demon is BOB, and the animal is an owl. Owls have commonly been associated with witches and demons, especially through the entity Lilith, who is a patroness of witches and often said to take the form of an owl, or as being a woman with legs and wings of and owl. This would make the animal a natural choice for a familiar. They seem to be BOB’s personal favorite animal to take the form of, or perhaps the only animal he can take the form of, since owls, and no other animal, are repeatedly warned against by multiple knowing sources.

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Wood cut by Hans Wechtlin

Almost every ancient culture has seen the owl as heralding misfortune and even death. They are associated with witches, graveyards and demons that lurk in the night. In Chinese folklore, owls are seen as an omen of death (as their “hoo” call sounds like the Chinese word “hu,” which means “dig,” i.e., “dig a grave”), and associated with ghosts. The Chinese also linked owls with thunder and lightning. This is significant to Twin Peaks‘s owls, due to the symbolism of electricity, heyoka, and thunderbirds of Native American folklore.

This supports the idea that the owls of Twin Peaks are spirits that spy on the townsfolk, either inhabited by BOB, other Dugpas, or being separate entities of their own. Evidence indicates that BOB utilizes the owls, or is taking the form of the owls, which also ties into the idea of him being MIKE’s familiar. One area of confusion for this theory, however, is when the Log Lady brings Cooper to the Roadhouse, telling him “we [my Log and I] don’t know what will happen or when, but there are owls in the Roadhouse.” However, BOB is not present: He is at the Palmer residence, murdering Maddy Ferguson. It should be noted that the Elderly Bellhop (one and the same with the Giant) is present, which lends credence to the idea that the owls are commonly used vessels for all Lodge spirits; not just BOB.

 

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If the owls are aliens, or if the owls are spirits, or vessels for the Dugpas, it is necessary at some point to question the distinction between each of these. According to writer Bob Engels, there were some rough ideas for Season 3 that involved the Dugpas being from a planet of creamed corn, which would make them aliens, and reinforce the Project Blue Book storyline. However, this would seem like some odd back-tracking, after the revelation that the message received from the deep space monitors came not from space, but from the woods. If this storyline is to be taken into consideration, though, it blurs the distinction between spirit and alien.

There is yet another theory that the owls are agents separate from the beings that we know, perhaps spirits of nature simply observing these events that pass through their woods. I would argue that this does little if anything for the story, and is contradicted by evidence that BOB is connected to the owls. Besides, most signs support the notion that the Dugpas are nature spirits of a kind, even if it is a darker side of nature.

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It’s most likely that no definitive answer will ever be given on the nature of Twin Peaks‘s owls, as final answers are so rarely given in Lynch’s surrealist world. There are so many theories to consider, each with their own set of compelling evidence. Which do you find to be the most convincing theory? Or do you have your own interpretation? What other mysteries from Twin Peaks still have you stumped? Let me know in the comments section below!

Did You Know? Twin Peaks Edition

David Lynch and Michael Anderson, a.k.a. the Man From Another Place. Photo by Richard Beymer.

David Lynch and Michael Anderson, a.k.a. the Man From Another Place. Photo by Richard Beymer.

Written by Eden H. Roquelaire for Twin Peaks Freaks.

Warning: Contains spoilers for Twin Peaks (and also The Simpsons Season 7. Don’t ask why, these things just happen.)

So, it looks like Lynch and Frost have hit another snag in their most anticipated project, and the new season of Twin Peaks has been postponed until 2017. We Peakers have to put up with a lot sometimes, don’t we? But we’re patient people when it comes to our favorite series, and we’ve already waited 25 years, so what’s the harm in one more? To help you kill time and make it to 2017, I’ve compiled some fun facts that even you may not know about our beloved Twin Peaks.

Laura and her Doppelganger, Marilyn Monroe.

Laura and her Doppelganger, Marilyn Monroe.

Did you know? Before they began developing Twin Peaks, David Lynch and Mark Frost were attempting to do an adaptation of the Marilyn Monroe biography, which would have been titled Goddess. However, they could not acquire the rights, so some of the elements of their screenplay found their way into Twin Peaks, helping to form Laura’s character especially: She’s a blonde beauty queen, idolized by everyone but with many dark secrets including drug addiction and sexual abuse, who had an affair with a rich and powerful man, and it is suspected that she was killed because she possessed some sensitive information regarding him.

Did you know? Mark Frost comes from a talented family: The role of Doc Hayward is played by Warren Frost, his father, who also worked in theater as an actor and stage director. Mark’s sister Lindsay is an actress, and his brother Scott is a writer.

 

Did you know? Twin Peaks was partly inspired by the 1944 film noir Laura. Elements lifted from the film are, of course, the name Laura, the use of a murdered woman’s diary to solve a crime, the names Waldo and Lydecker, and a detective seeing a murdered woman in person after her death.

 

Did you know? David Lynch’s daughter, Jennifer Lynch, is a director in her own right. Her filmography includes Boxing Helena (1993), Surveillance (2008), and even an episode of The Walking Dead! Jennifer Lynch was also the one given the task of writing The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer, and as such, she was one of three people who were told the identity of the killer.

 

Did you know? Three Twin Peaks actors appeared in the 1987 movie RoboCop: Ray Wise (Leland Palmer) played Leon Nash, Miguel Ferrer (Albert Rosenfield) played Bob Morton, and Dan O’Herlihy (Andrew Packard) played the unforgettable character known as “the Old Man.”

Ray Wise with his buddies in RoboCop.

Ray Wise with his buddies in RoboCop.

Did you know? Sheryl Lee, who played Laura Palmer and Maddy Ferguson, makes a cameo appearance in the 2007 film Winter’s Bone. When she is first shown, a song is playing in the background, with lyrics that say, “I wonder if you still remember me, or has time erased your memory? As I listen to the breeze whisper gently through the threes, I wonder if you still remember me.” These lyrics are greatly reminiscent of the song Lynch and Badalamenti wrote for the final episode of Twin Peaks, “Sycamore Trees,” which features the lyrics, “and I’ll see you and you’ll see me, and I’ll see you in the branches that blow, in the trees.” Perhaps the director of Winter’s Bone is a Twin Peaks fan?

 

Did you know? The actress who plays Sandy’s mother in Blue Velvet is Hope Lange, who starred in the movie Peyton Place, which is credited as a source of inspiration for Twin Peaks: It’s about a small town that looks on the surface to be the American Dream, but in truth, it harbors many dark secrets.

Hope Lange in Peyton Place (1957)

Hope Lange in Peyton Place (1957)

Did you know? Pretty much every David Lynch film has featured a night club, usually with its own unique singer. Twin Peaks and Fire Walk With Me have the Roadhouse, where Julee Cruise’s band performs, and the Bang Bang Bar. Blue Velvet has the Slow Club where Dororthy Valens sings. Wild At Heart shows Sailor at a club singing Elvis Presley’s “Love Me.” In Lost Highway, Fred plays saxophone with a band at an unnamed club. Mulholland Drive features the infamous Club Silencio, where Rebekah Del Rio sings a Spanish version of Roy Orbison’s “Crying.” And in Inland Empire, Nikki/Sue runs into a night club where a burlesque dancer is performing.

 

Did you know? Clarence Williams III, who, in the second season of Twin Peaks, played Roger Hardy from Internal Affairs, appeared in the Mod Squad with Peggy Lipton (Norma Jennings).

Did you know? Alicia Witt, who played Donna’s little sister Gerstin (the pianist) is still acting. She has appeared in recent series such as Justified and House of Lies.

Alicia Witt, a.k.a. Gerstin Hayward, in 2015

Alicia Witt, a.k.a. Gerstin Hayward, in 2015

Did you know? Sheriff Truman has a mounted deer head in his office, beneath which is a plaque declaring “The Buck Stopped Here.” This is a reference to President Harry Truman’s motto, “The Buck Stops Here.”

 

Did you know? Frank Silva (who played Killer BOB) was originally just a set dresser for Twin Peaks. However, his reflection was accidentally filmed in a scene in the pilot, which led to Lynch, who often utilizes accidents creatively, conceiving of the character BOB, and cast Silva in the role.

 

Did you know? Nearly all of Lynch’s films have had at least one actor from Twin Peaks:

  • Eraserhead has Jack Nance (Pete Martell) and Charlotte Stewart (Betty Briggs), and Catherine Coulson (The Log Lady) was behind the scenes. (She was originally going to be in the movie, but her scenes were cut.)
  • Blue Velvet has Kyle MacLachlan (Agent Cooper) and Jack Nance. Lynch also planned to have Isabella Rossellini appear in Twin Peaks, but she turned down the role which afterward went to Joan Chen.
  • Dune has Jack Nance and Kyle MacLachlan.
  • Wild at Heart has cameos from Jack Nance, Sheryl Lee (Laura Palmer and Maddy Fergusson) and Sherilyn Fenn (Audrey Horne)
  • Lost Highway has Jack Nance in a brief cameo, which also happens to be his last appearance.
  • The Straight Story features Everett McGill (Ed Hurley).
  • Mulholland Drive briefly features Michael Anderson (The Man from Another Place) as the mysterious Mr Roq.
  • Inland Empire has a cameo from Grace Zabriskie.

The only feature film to not contain an actor from the Twin Peaks series is The Elephant Man, which also happens to be the only Lynch film not to feature Jack Nance prior to his death in 1997.

 

Did you know? Jack Nance and Michael Horse (Deputy Hawk) also appear in David Lynch’s short, The Cowboy and the Frenchman (1987). Nance’s character is also called Pete.

 

Did you know? Jack Nance and Catherine Coulson were married from 1968-1976. Coulson jokingly accredited their divorce to the fact that she was Nance’s hairdresser for Eraserhead.

How many happy relationships must this monstrous coif destroy before it is satisfied?!

How many happy relationships must this monstrous coif destroy before it is satisfied?!

Did you know? Jennifer Lynch was largely given creative control over The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer, aside from a few notes given by David Lynch and Mark Frost. Writing on a computer, she completed the first draft of the book in nine days, but, after flying to New York, found that the information was completely missing. This forced her to rewrite the entire thing, this time using a typewriter, to avoid any technical mishaps.

Did you know? Sherilyn Fenn insisted to the writers that it isn’t really possible to tie a cherry stem with with your tongue.

 

Did you know? Angelo Badalamenti has provided music for all of Lynch’s works from Blue Velvet (1986) to Mulholland Drive (2001). Inland Empire was the first film since Blue Velvet not to contain any work by the composer. Instead, Lynch drew mostly from pre-recorded materials by artists such as Nina Simone, Beck, and Ella Fitzgerald. Incidentally, Chrysta Bell, who co-wrote and sang “Polish Poem” for the soundtrack, has done a live cover of Beck’s “Black Tambourine,” which also appears on the soundtrack.

 

Did you know? Twin Peaks has a real-life connection to Marilyn Monroe: Actor Miguel Ferrer (Albert Rosenfield) was held by Marilyn Monroe as a baby, when his mother, actress and singer Rosemary Clooney, attended one of Monroe’s parties.

 

Did you know? Both Kyle MacLachlan and Lara Flynn Boyle actually hate cherry pie.

It kind of ruins the fantasy to realize that, behind that thumbs up, he's revolted.

It kind of ruins the fantasy to realize that, behind that thumbs up, he’s revolted.

Did you know? The character of Maddy Ferguson originally wasn’t part of the plan: Lynch and Frost invented her pretty much at the last minute as a way to keep Sheryl Lee in the show. The character’s name is a blatant reference to one of Lynch’s favorite films, Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo, which stars Jimmy Stewart as Scottie Ferguson and Kim Novak as Madeleine Elster.

 

Did you know? Jack Nance’s real, full name is Marvin John Nance.

Did you know? Mrs Tremond’s grandson was, in the series, played by David Lynch’s son, Austin Jack Lynch. He also showed up seventeen years later, in his father’s feature film Inland Empire (he is sitting on the couch in Devon’s dressing room). Austin Lynch also works as a director, though with a much smaller filmography than his dad: He filmed “The Making of…” documentary for the DVD extras for the film The New World (2005).

Austin Jack Lynch, all grown up.

Austin Jack Lynch, all grown up.

Did you know? Angelo Badalamenti sings on the track “A Real Indication” from the Fire Walk With Me soundtrack. The song was invented on the spot, inspired by Bobby and Laura’s interaction at the school.

Did you know? To keep information from leaking to the public when the identity of Laura’s killer was revealed, different versions of Maddy’s murder were filmed: One with just Leland, one with just BOB, and one with Ben Horne. The Simpsons later parodied this in their episode “The Simpsons 138th Episode Spectacular,” which shows a alternate outcomes for the episode “Who Shot Mr. Burns Part 2,” wherein Mr. Burns’s assistant Smithers is revealed to be the killer. This was also allegedly created to keep the real killer’s identity from leaking to the public. Also, “Who Shot Mr. Burns Part 2” contains two Twin Peaks parodies: Its title is a play on the tagline “Who killed Laura Palmer,” and there is a scene where the police chief dreams of a Black Lodge-like place, where a “backwards-talking [girl] with flaming cards” gives him obscure clues. He awakes from the dream with his hair stuck in a cowlick, the same way Cooper awakes from his Black Lodge dream.

Did you know? References to Twin Peaks have appeared in countless shows. Psyche had its own Twin Peaks tribute episode which guest-starred many of the cast members. Adult Swim’s The Eric Andre Show parodied the Twin Peaks opening and used the tagline “Who Killed Hannibal?” (Hannibal Buress is the show’s co-host.) The Simpsons have referenced it three times (two are listed above), the third time showing a flashback of Homer watching Twin Peaks in the early 90s. Comedian Eddie Pepitone, in his special In Ruins, Laura Palmer’s murder as a key reference in one of his jokes. Even Buffy the Vampire Slayer has referenced Twin Peaks twice (arguably): One episode takes place in the characters’ dreams, which are being controlled by a supernatural entity, and one dream features the character Willow walking down a hallway of red curtains. In another episode, Buffy references Lynch’s nonlinear film-making with the line, “Is that why time went all David Lynch?”

Buffy Summers has good taste in cinema.

Buffy Summers has good taste in cinema.

Did you know? Twin Peaks was nominated for the 2014 TCA Heritage Award, along with Lost, South Park, Saturday Night Live, and Star Trek. It lost to Saturday Night Live.

Did you know? Speaking of Twin Peaks and Star Trek, many actors from Twin Peaks have also appeared on the various incarnations of Star Trek, including Ray Wise (Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Voyager), Madchen Amick, (Star Trek: The Next Generation) Wendy Robie (Deep Space 9), and Miguel Ferrer (feature film Star Trek III: The Search for Spock).

Wendy Robie in Stark Trek: Deep Space Nine.

Wendy Robie in Stark Trek: Deep Space Nine.

Did you know? Twin Peaks has inspired a number of songs, including “Wrapped in Plastic” by Marilyn Manson, “Spark” by Tori Amos, and “Nadine Hurley” by London punk girl band Skinny Girl Diet.

Did you know? The actors who played Ed and Nadine Hurley, Everett McGill and Wendy Robie respectively, also played a husband and wife in the 1991 horror film The People Under the Stairs.

Did you know? Twin Peaks has inspired many television shows, including Psyche, American Horror Story, Wayward Pines, Lost, True Detective, Louie (which had David Lynch himself guest-star in two episodes) and Hemlock Grove, to name just a few. Feature films inspired by Twin Peaks include Lake Mungo, Requiem for a Dream, and Donnie Darkko.

Did you know? Twin Peaks has also inspired several video games, such as the Silent Hill series, and the supernatural detective game Alan Wake. Even the popular game series The Legend of Zelda has drawn from Twin Peaks: Its 4th installment, Link’s Awakening, takes the protagonist to a dream world full of strange individuals who speak in cryptic phrases. It even includes a mysterious forest and an owl that is not what it seems. Some of these Twin Peaks-inspired elements would go on to recur throughout the series. In one of the games, the mysterious owl serves as a disguise for a wise old man who aids the protagonist. It seems even in video games, the owls are not what they seem.

 

Like BOB, the wise man in the Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time disguises himself as an owl.

Like BOB, the wise man in the Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time disguises himself as an owl.

That’s all for this edition. I hope you learned some interesting new info. Know any more fun facts about Twin Peaks? Post them in the comments below! I’ll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile…

LauraScream

“With This Ring, I Thee Wed”

Written by Eden H. Roquelaire for Twin Peaks Freaks

The circle of Sycamore Trees at Glastonbury Grove, where the entrance to the Lodges is located.

The circle of Sycamore Trees at Glastonbury Grove, where the entrance to the Lodges is located.

“BOB and I, when we were killing together, it was this, this perfect relationship. Appetite, satisfaction; a golden circle.” -The One-Armed Man

A circle of trees… A golden ring… A spinning ceiling fan… A gem with a mysterious insignia… A phone with a little ring… A circle of burning candles… A beautiful girl’s ring… A cycle of appetite and satisfaction.

There are many rings, and references to rings, in Twin Peaks; The ring with the Owl Cave insignia on it (which for the sake of brevity we will call the “Owl Ring”); Cooper’s ring, which the Giant takes and returns to him once the killer’s identity is revealed; Audrey’s query to Cooper, “Do you like my ring?” But what does all that mean? Some of them are arguably less significant than others, but, according to my theory, any small reference to “rings” or “circles” is there to reinforce the importance of the more overt ring symbols. In this article, we will focus on the meaning behind these symbols, and what is perhaps the true meaning of the Owl Ring.

The Little Man From Another Place holding the Owl Ring.

The Little Man From Another Place holding the Owl Ring.

We already know that the Owl Ring is associated with BOB, MIKE and their victims: Both Teresa Banks and Laura Palmer were wearing it before they died, and Annie Blackburn returned from the Black Lodge with it on her finger. Agent Chester Desmond, in his investigation into Teresa’s murder, discovers the Owl Ring, and afterwards, disappears. In Agent Philip Jeffries’ flashback, we see the Little Man from Another Place put the Owl Ring on the green Formica table and say: “With this ring, I thee wed,” after which Mrs. Tremond’s Grandson/the Chalfont boy points at BOB and says “Fell a victim,” which may be an order, or a statement. I believe it was an order.

The Chalfont boy telling BOB to "fell a victim."

The Chalfont boy telling BOB to “fell a victim.”

Mrs. Tremond expresses her dislike of creamed corn to Donna.

Mrs. Tremond expresses her dislike of creamed corn to Donna.

It is my theory that the Chalfonts are the Black Lodge Dopplegangers of the Tremonds: The Chalfonts are working only to aid in the collection of more Garmonbozia, manipulating Laura and making it easier for her to slip into BOB’s clutches (I believe the painting they gave her is designed as a kind of trap), while the Tremonds give Donna clues about the identity of Laura’s killer. In Jeffries’ vision, we are seeing the Chalfont boy participating in the Black Lodge ritual and commanding BOB to go fetch them more Garmonbozia. We know that circles are often used in real-life rituals, and we even see MIKE ritualistically chanting “Fire Walk With Me” as he lights a circle of twelve candle, mimicking the circle of twelve sycamore trees surrounding the entrance to the Lodge in Glastonbury Grove; an entrance which can only be opened by a ritualistic act of either Love or Fear. It seems to me that the multiple mentions of “rings” and “circles” implies a cyclical nature to these ritualistic killings: In these almost ritualistic murders, there is always a Killer (BOB inside of a Vessel) and a Victim, to whom he is wedded. As long as Laura did not put on the ring, she would not be the Victim: She would be the Vessel for the Killer. However, once she put the Owl Ring on, she was ritualistically wed to Killer BOB, and thus had to be murdered, in order to faithfully complete the ritual. It appears that there is some law that the denizens of the Black Lodge must follow, binding them to the rules of this feeding ritual. Once the Owl Ring has been placed upon the chosen Victim’s finger, the Killer must execute them. Agent Chet Desmond finds the Owl Ring in a mound of dirt underneath the Chalfont’s trailer, so presumably another ritual was taking place, had taken place, or was about to take place there. This may have been where Teresa’s sacrifice was made, as she was killed very nearby in her trailer, or it may have been set in order to sacrifice Desmond himself. But if Desmond was not sacrificed, then what happened to him? Why did he disappear after finding the Owl Ring? Judging by what we already know about the Black Lodge, he most likely slipped into that world, and became trapped there, as Agent Cooper eventually would. This is, perhaps, also part of the ritual cycle: A detective investigates the murder of a woman, and the detective goes missing. Theoretical examples of this would be Teresa Banks/Chet Desmond and Sam Stanley, Laura Palmer/Dale Cooper, and Judy(?)/Philip Jeffries.

MIKE performs the Fire Walk With Me Ritual.

MIKE performs the Fire Walk With Me Ritual.

Taking this theory further, it is a possibility that Audrey’s reference to her ring may have been an early foreshadow to the purpose of the Owl Ring: To indicate who BOB’s next victim would be. This was meant, according to my theory, to reference early on the fact that Audrey would eventually be BOB’s intended victim, after he had possessed Evil Cooper (This is before the character of Annie was made up to take Audrey’s place).

The question is where MIKE fits into this ritual. He refers to BOB as his partner, and says that they killed together, which implies that they both played the role of Killer. Another possibility is that BOB was more of a servant to MIKE; he executed the Victim on behalf of MIKE, and delivered the Garmonbozia to him. In Cooper’s dream-vision, MIKE portrays himself almost as having been enslaved to the killing impulse until he cut his left arm off. The left arm may be a significant choice here, as it references not only the “Left-Hand” or “Sinister” Path, but also the ring finger, which in American tradition is on the left hand. In the final episode, as the path to the Black Lodge is opening up, Cooper, Pete, and a woman at the Double R experience tremors in their hands as a sort of presentiment. Major Briggs also, arguably, experiences this hand tremor when he is picked up after having been injected with truth serum: Both hands (and indeed his whole body) are shaking, but, when he is in the sheriff’s department, he is holding up his left hand, with his wedding ring on it, against his face, which may be reinforcing the significance of the ring finger in Twin Peaks’ symbolism. (Interesting note: Cooper, Pete and the woman at the diner all experience tremors in their right hands.) We have seen that MIKE wore Owl Ring on his right pinky finger while showing it to Laura: Is it possible that, before he cut off his left arm, he wore the evil ring on his own left hand during these times? And is it possible that wearing the Owl Ring is what allowed MIKE to possess Philip Gerard in the first place? We can only speculate.

MIKE wearing the Owl Ring.

MIKE wearing the Owl Ring

Two more important elements to note are the cycle of the planets and time loops. The cycle of the planets is of great significance to the Lodges and its residence, as it is by watching for certain alignments that one may know when the portal to the Lodges will open. We may also speculate that it was important to them because certain rituals could or should only be performed during certain alignments (think of the Pagan Sabbats, for example, which are celebrations taking place during certain planetary alignments). Time loops are also a noticeable aspect not only of Twin Peaks, but in many of David Lynch’s films. Fire Walk With Me is notoriously both a prequel and a sequel to the series, as events that occur both before and after the events of the series take place in a very disorienting manner. How is Annie Blackburn seen in Laura’s bed, speaking words she says after the events of the series finale? How is Dale Cooper already in the Lodge, speaking to Laura in her dream? How is Cooper an old man in the Lodge, while Laura is still a young woman? The answer is: Because time is not linear in the Lodges, as it is in our world. When it comes to the Black Lodge, time twists and turns, and when it interacts with this world, it may be that time loops and warps are a symptom of its interferences. This may be how Cooper and Annie are able to speak to Laura across time, and Cooper is seen as old, while Laura appears to still be young (although there may be other explanations for these instances). Hence the “ring” symbolism could also refer to the all-important cycle of the planets, as well as the bizarre time loops cause by the Black Lodge.

The full Owl Cave symbol.

The full Owl Cave symbol.

A final question: What is the significance of the symbol emblazoned on the ring, and why is it the same as the petroglyphs in Owl Cave? Well, it seems that the Black Lodge’s occupants have been crossing into this world for some time: They seem to have had encounters with the Native Americans, working their way into their folklore, which Hawk recounts to Agent Cooper. In the early days of their journeys into this world, the Dugpas may have had encounters with early humans, who then drew what they had seen onto the walls of what would become Owl Cave. Another possibility is that an early incarnation of the Bookhouse Boys is responsible for the drawings and strange mechanisms in Owl Cave. It is implied that the Bookhouse Boys have known about something deep in the woods for some time now, though they may never have been entirely sure what it was. They may have learned about the Black Lodge and its occupants, and hidden the information in Owl Cave, so that future initiates could find it if need be, and so the information could not be misused by those with an evil heart, such as Windom Earle. Whatever the reason was, it is most probable that the symbol has been used by the Dugpas for ritualistic purposes for centuries. It looks like a stylized owl, and though that interpretation is accurate, we all know that the owls are not what they seem, and therefore, neither is the symbol. I believe that the symbol can also be interpreted thusly: The “wings” are the Twin Peaks which give the town its name, and the diamond shape between them is the portal to the Lodges.

Another important thing of note: Tibetan Buddhism uses the idea of karma, which, among other things, plays a large role in the death experience, and controls what happens to a person when they die. If you are a good person, who chose wisely, acted kindly, and chose the path of love and light, then you would ascend to a higher level when you died. If, however, you lived as a cruel, ignorant or violent person, you could get caught in a karmic circle of pain and suffering, and be forced to reincarnate over and over again, until you evolve spiritually and become a better person. By choosing not to face his shadow self, and instead running from him in fear, Cooper was choosing the lower path; the path of fear and ignorance. Thus, instead of finding his way safely through the Black Lodge, he was trapped in a loop, unable to escape.

In summary: The Black Lodge denizens participate in an ancient ritual; a cycle of blood sacrifices. As part of the ritual, they created a special ring (the Owl Ring) to mark their chosen sacrifices. These sacrifices result in the production of Garmonbozia (pain and suffering), which the Dugpas feed upon. The various ring and circle symbols scattered throughout Twin Peaks reinforce the significance of this object to the central storyline. By taking Cooper’s ring, the Giant was not only giving him a sign that he’d finally found the killer, but was also giving him a visually key with which he could decipher the rest of the mystery. Too bad he didn’t get the chance before the series was cancelled. But with Showtime’s revival of Twin Peaks in 2016, there is a chance the Giant’s clue may not go entirely unnoticed.