…On the Differing Opinions of the Finale…

Tammy&Albert

Written by Eden H. Roquelaire for Twin Peaks Freaks.

I’ve had a lot of requests for my review/analysis of the finale of The Return, and I promise you, it is coming, but there’s one thing I think I need to address before delving into such tempestuous waters.

The finale for The Return has been one of the most divisive ever, just as, if not more, controversial than the original cliffhanger for Twin Peaks‘ original run. I have my opinions. Everyone else has theirs. But no matter what your opinion is, I have a message for you. We need to stop fighting amongst ourselves, and be more understanding with those of differing opinions. Of course there will always be arguments and disagreements, but one thing that needs to end is this animosity between those who thought the finale was brilliant, and those who thought it had a lot of problems.

There’s a misconception about those who didn’t like the finale, that they need to “learn Lynch” (which is a condescending and elitist statement), and they just “didn’t get it.” Perhaps there are some this is true for, sure. Twin Peaks fans come from a varied bag. But overall, I see complaints coming from all walks of life, all kinds of fans, those who just loved Twin Peaks and those who are well-versed in film and Lynch’s other works. I want to make a statement now:

It is not one or the other. If you disliked the finale, it doesn’t mean you wanted a cliche Hollywood fairytale ending. Not everything your favorite director does is brilliant, nor are you compelled to love it regardless. I love Darren Aronofsky, but I didn’t enjoy The Wrestler or Noah. And you know, I absolutely love David Lynch’s work, but I have little interest in Wild At Heart. And that’s fine.

And if you liked the finale, that doesn’t mean you are just kissing ass. It doesn’t mean that you’ll eat whatever garbage you’re given “just because it’s Lynch.” Everyone is satisfied by different art. If you weren’t invested in seeing something conclusive, then the finale was an enjoyable trip into the bizarre, and groundbreaking television. It definitely was groundbreaking.

And guess what? It’s fine to be somewhere in the middle. I think I’ve enjoyed the analysis over the finale as much as watching it. I love to see peoples’ brains working, whether it’s an attempt to make sense of the story, or you’re analyzing what made it so revolutionary. It’s fine to be either or and neither. What’s not fine is being a rude and condescending to people who have a different opinion. Twin Peaks speaks to many different people on many different levels. It’s art, it’s soap opera, it’s intellectual, it’s campy. And the two-part finale ran the gamut of emotions and genres. It was overwhelming, to say the least. And it’s OK to hate it, and it’s OK to love it, and it’s OK to still be indecisive. Just be understanding with your fellow Peaks Freaks, please.

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All right. Now that that’s out of the way, I will be beginning work on my analysis of the finale. Thank you for being patient with me, it’s been quite a ride and I needed some time to recover. I’d like to get your opinions on how I should approach this analysis, if I should do a scene-by-scene breakdown, or go through all the arcs and and give an analytical overview? Or something else? Let me know what you’d like to see. Comment below.

And for some shameless self-promotion, I now have a paying gig over at Vocal, so you can check out my articles here. I have articles on Twin Peaks, video games, and television, with many more articles coming, so go and follow me there if you want to see even more content from me! In the meantime, I’ll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile…

ED

…I’ll be trying to sort through all the emotions the finale brought up in me.

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